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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of Control of insects affecting forage alfalfa. found in the catalog.

Control of insects affecting forage alfalfa.

Control of insects affecting forage alfalfa.

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Cooperative Extension Service, Washington State University in Pullman, Wash .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesExtension mimeo -- 2561., Extension mimeo (Washington State University. Cooperative Extension) -- 2561.
ContributionsWashington State University. Cooperative Extension Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination2 leaves.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17612559M
OCLC/WorldCa41810414

Pests & Diseases; Forage Weed Control; Forage Economics; Pests & Diseases. The primary in­sect problems in Ohio are the alfalfa weevil and the potato leafhopper in alfalfa. The alfalfa weevil is primarily active in the spring while the potato leafhopper is active during the sum­mer months. Both can cause severe yield and quality losses in. Progressive Forage is the Forage Industry Resource for progressive hay, silage and pasture producers. With contributors including freelance writers, extension specialists and allied industry partners, the leading-edge content is balanced and promotes the best in the forage industry.

Alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., is among the most prized of forages, and is grown worldwide as a feed for all classes of livestock. It is one of man's oldest crops, and its cultivation probably predates recorded history. In addition to its versatility as a feed, alfalfa is well known for its ability to improve soil structure and, as a legume, is an effective source of biological nitrogen. As a. Alfalfa Forage Insect Control. applications for defoliators are most effective when larvae are small and/or webbing (webworms only) is minimal. For a detailed description of the larvae found in Okla-homa alfalfa, consult OSU Extension Fact Sheet F

Take control of crop success with unbiased crop research, publications and news from University of Minnesota Extension. Crop News: get statewide and regional updates Events: see upcoming crop learning opportunities around Minnesota Current issues and highlighted resources: respond to weather, pests or other challenges Podcasts and video: listen, watch and learn.   Forage Extension Program Nicholasville Rd. N Ag Science Bldg North Lexington, KY


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Control of insects affecting forage alfalfa Download PDF EPUB FB2

Alfalfa crops are usually home to large numbers of insects and a great diversity of species. Most of these insects are harmless or beneficial; lady beetles are an example.

Pest species generally are found in numbers too few to reduce alfalfa yield. Unfortunately, in some fields and in some years, insect pest populations reach levels that could cause economic yield loss. Because of these. Currently only three insects are of general concern to alfalfa producers in New York.

These are the alfalfa weevil, the alfalfa snout beetle, and the potato leafhopper. The alfalfa weevil and the alfalfa snout beetle are abundant before the first cutting, and the potato leafhopper is anticipated after the first cutting.

Alfalfa. (“Choosing an Alfalfa Variety”) for a complete discussion of pest resistance. Resistance is also discussed in sections on individual pests. A list of alfalfa varieties and the pests they are resistant to, including insects, diseases, and nematodes, is available from the National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance and can be.

Alfalfa plant bug Alfalfa is a primary host of the alfalfa plant bug, making this insect a pest to watch for. Adults are approximately 3/8 of an inch long and pale green to brown in color. They are nearly twice the size of lygus bugs, although the two can sometimes be confused. Robert Lee Metcalf was an American entomologist, environmental toxicologist, and insect chemical ecologist.

Metcalf was noted for making environmentally safe pest control achievable. William H. Luckmann is the editor of Introduction to Insect Pest Management, 3rd Edition, published by s: 1.

Insect identification is a key to management, especially when determining immature stages. For example, pea aphids and blue alfalfa aphids are easily confused; however, blue alfalfa aphids do significantly more damage than pea aphids.

Pea aphids generally don’t require control, but blue alfalfa aphids do. Harvested Forages deals with the subject of food for domestic animal feeding.

Such food is called "forage" and includes things like alfalfa and other plants usually referred to as "hay." Topics include the ways that this forage is produced, how it is harvested, and ways that it should be stored.

Transgenic Herbicide-Tolerant Alfalfa (3/17) Preventing Weed Resistance And Weed Shifts (3/17) Weed Management in Seedling Alfalfa. Integrated Weed Management in Seedling Alfalfa (3/17) Alfalfa Weed Photo Gallery, with Common and Scientific Names in Seedling Alfalfa (3/17) Susceptibility of Weeds to Herbicide Control in Seedling Alfalfa (3/17).

Apply only to pure stands of alfalfa. Lambda-cyhalothrin plus chlorantraniliprole (Voliam Xpress) This product is a combination of 2 insecticides with activity agains both chewing and sucking insects.

It is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or to residues on blooming crops and weeds. PHI is 1 day for forage and 7 days for hay. UC Management Guidelines for Cutworms on Alfalfa. The following are ranked with the pesticides having the greatest IPM value listed first—the most effective and least harmful to natural enemies, honey bees, and the environment are at the top of the table.

When choosing a pesticide, consider information relating to air and water quality, resistance management, and the pesticide's properties. CONTROL: Control measures only taken if economic thresholds are reached to help protect beneficial insects present in the field.

Natural pests such as the lady bird beetle, minute pirate bug, damsel bug, syrphid fly larvae, and a number of parasitic wasps can help control populations. In warm moist weather a fungal disease can also affect aphids. Alfalfa foliage can be attacked by several fungal pathogens.

Most foliar diseases are favored by wet weather and moderate temperatures. Severe leaf disease development reduces yield and nutritional quality of the forage and depletes the reserves of carbohydrate in the roots necessary for plant regrowth and dormant period survival.

actively growing alfalfa for control of emerged weeds. Roundup Ultra® must be applied to actively growing weeds to be effective, but will also kill any actively growing alfalfa plants it contacts. Sencor ®, Lexone, and Sinbar® can only be applied in dor-mant, established alfalfa stands.

For more information concerning herbi. Chemical and non-chemical control measures for forage insect management. Factors influencing alfalfa stand longevity are being investigated through funding received from the WSARE Chapter 1 program. An extensive survey is being conducted throughout Montana and one site was visited in fall in Yellowstone County.

Seedlings of direct-seeded crops are more vulnerable to damage — get a head start against flea beetles and other pests by using transplants.

Weed control. To reduce potential feeding sites in the spring, control weeds, especially those in the brassica family, and distance any garden flowers you are growing that are in the same family.

Row covers. Weeds affect alfalfa stands in different ways during the various stages of alfalfa production: prior to establishment, in the seedling stage, and in established stands. Figure 1. Flixweed (Descurainia sophia), an annual mustard, infestation in alfalfa.

These late winter weeds are relatively easy to control with several post-emergence herbicides. Pests such as insects, diseases, and weeds can lead to poor stands.

Herbicides and insecticides may be used to control some of the pests. Selecting varieties with resistance to diseases and insects is the best assurance for control. For information concerning pest control. Management of forage insect pests is aimed primarily at the alfalfa weevil and the potato leafhopper in alfalfa.

Other insect pests of forages are minor in comparison and must be dealt with on a field-by-field basis. Economic injury levels for the potato leafhopper and the alfalfa weevil are fairly well established.

E The Armyworm and the Army Cutworm, August E Integrated Pest Management of Alfalfa Weevil in North Dakota, July E Blister Beetles, August Soil fertility and pH: The recommended soil pH for alfalfa is to Forage grasses and clovers should have a pH of or above. The minimum or critical soil phosphorus level for forage legumes is 30 ppm Mehlich-3 and for grasses 20 ppm Mehlich The critical soil potassium level is ppm for most of our soils.

Check herbicide history. Effect of autotoxicity on alfalfa stands when alfalfa is seeded (a) immediately following alfalfa plowdown, (b) 4 weeks later, and (c) after 1 year.

b c a 0 weeks 2 weeks 4 weeks fall-killed after corn number of plants/ft 2 0 10 20 30 40 50 0 weeks 2 weeks 4 weeks fall-killed after corn yield (% of check variety) 0 20 40 60 80 plowed no-till.Southwestern: Most alfalfa stands overwintered well; however those on heavy soils and in low-lying areas may have suffered winter injury.

New seedings and annual forage acres are expected to increase this year in response to weather conditions over and As of May 27th, alfalfa weevils had reached 1st instar.Department of Entomology W.

Waters Hall Old Claflin Place Kansas State University Manhattan KS fax [email protected]